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The Planning Guide to Piping Design

The Planning Guide to Piping Design

ISBN: 978-1-933762-37-1

No. of Pages: 300

Author: Richard Beale, Paul Bowers and Peter Smith

Publisher: Gulf Publishing Company

The Planning Guide to Piping Design covers the entire process of planning a plant model project from conceptual to mechanical completion, and explains where the piping lead falls in the process along with his roles and responsibilities.

Publication Date: August 2010

Price: $185  


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Refinery Design & Construction

Fresh off of volume two of his piping series, Advanced Piping Design, Peter Smith has joined forces with skilled consultants to take his piping series to the next level. The Planning Guide to Piping Design covers the entire process of planning a plant model project from conceptual to mechanical completion, and explains where the piping lead falls in the process along with his roles and responsibilities. Piping Engineering Leads (or PEL's) used to only receive on-the-job training to learn the operation of producing a process plant. Over time, more schools and programs have developed a more advanced curriculum for piping engineers and designers. However, younger generations of engineers and designers are growing up with a much more technological view of piping design and are in need of a handbook that will explain the proven methods of planning and monitoring the piping design in step-by-step processes. This handbook will provide mentors in the process piping industries the bridge needed for the upcoming engineer and designer to grasp the requirements of piping supervision in the modern age. Critical topics covered in this handbook include:
 
- Plot plans, key plans and other deliverables 

- Detailed design, such as the importance of construction work packages, model boundaries, modularization, CAD   support and model reviews 
- Fabrication, including scopes of work, spool fabrication and new tools for automatic spool sheet generation of pipe spool drawings 
- And construction, such as support to construction, punch lists, requests for information, as-builts and safety

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About the Authors

Richard Beale has over 35 years of plant layout and piping design experience on heavy-oil facilities, refineries, gas plants, pulp and paper facilities and pipelines. Starting as a junior piping draftsman in 1974, he has witnessed the progression of piping design and drafting from manual drafting to 2D CAD and 3D CAD. During his career, he has been a drafter, designer, squad leader, overall project piping lead, and design and drafting department manager with several major engineering consulting companies, as well as technical support to fabrication and construction companies. He has also been an instructor in piping drafting at the polytechnic school in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where he lives, and serves on the advisory committee at this same institution for the Engineering Design and Drafting Technology program as an industry representative. He is currently employed as an advisor to a major oil and gas producer.

Paul Bowers started in the piping design business in 1981 as a junior draftsman on-site at a refinery in Montreal. His areas of plant-piping design experience include chemical, pulp and paper, industrial gases/cryogenics, refining, mining and heavy oil. In 1998, Paul founded PipingDesign.com as a way to educate, inform and connect with those interested in piping design, and he is a member of ASME. Now residing in Calgary, Paul is co-president of SPED Calgary.

Peter Smith is an independent consultant with more than 30 years of experience in the onshore and offshore sectors of the oil and gas industry. He has worked on the design, construction and commissioning phases on refineries, offshore platforms, pipelines and FPSO projects in Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia. Having worked for both major operating companies and international EPC contractors on projects that were designed using manually produced drawings, he has witnessed the evolving CAD era and appreciates the advances and advantages of this new technology. He is also aware of some of the short comings that new technology brings, which prompted him to begin writing this piping series.

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Table of Contents

The Planning Guide to Piping Design by Richard Beale, Paul Bowers and Peter Smith

Foreword xiii
Preface xv
List of Figures xix
List of Tables xxiii

1 Before You Begin...................................................1
1.1 Introduction 1
1.2 Standards 2
1.2.1 Standard Drawings 2
1.2.2 Charts 8
1.2.3 Drawing Templates and Drawing
Standards 12
1.2.4 Drawing Numbering 13
1.2.5 3-D Model Numbering 14
1.2.6 Material Commodity Codes 14
1.3 Specifications 15
1.3.1 Piping Classes 16
1.4 Procedures 22
1.4.1 Stick Files 23
1.4.2 Inter-discipline Drawing Reviews 24
1.4.3 Line Numbering 24
1.4.4 Stress Analysis 25
1.4.5 CAD Set-Up 25
1.4.6 3-D Model Reviews 27
1.4.7 Checking 28
1.4.8 Manhour Estimating 28
1.4.9 Progress Reporting 28
1.4.10 Management of Change 28
1.4.11 As-Builting 31
1.4.12 Project Close-out 32
1.5 Piping Execution Plan 32
1.5.1 Design Basis Memorandum (DBM) 33
1.5.2 Project Execution Plan (PEP) 33
1.5.3 Contracting and Procurement Plan and
Construction Execution Plan 34
1.6 Conclusion 34

2 Procedures ...........................................................35
2.1 Introduction 35
2.2 Master Stick Files, Working Copies, and
Inter-discipline Drawing Reviews (IDR) 35
2.2.1 Master Stick Files 37
2.2.2 Working Copies 41
2.2.3 Inter-discipline Drawing Reviews 42
2.3 Vendor Drawing Reviews 48
2.4 Line Numbering 50
2.4.1 Line Numbering Rules 50
2.5 Stress Analysis 53
2.5.1 The Stress Analysis Procedure 54
2.5.2 Stress Analysis Procedure Notes 62
2.6 Model Reviews 67
2.6.1 Model Review Procedure 69
2.6.2 Model Review Matrix 71
2.7 Checking 71
2.7.1 Clash Check Reporting Procedure 78
2.7.2 Equipment Checking Procedure 79
2.7.3 Piping Arrangement and Isometric
Checking 81
2.7.4 Prerequisites and Checking Procedure 84
2.8 Manhour Estimating and Manpower Planning 91
2.8.1 Manhour Estimating 92
2.8.2 Manpower Planning 97
2.8.3 Other Considerations 101

3 Deliverables .......................................................103
3.1 Introduction 103
3.2 Deliverables 108
3.2.1 Cover Sheets and Drawing Indexes 109
3.2.2 Plot Plan 110
3.2.3 Key Plans: 113
3.2.4 Location Plans 114
3.2.5 Piping Arrangements 116
3.2.6 Isometrics 116
3.2.7 Isometric Logs 119
3.2.8 Tie-In Isometrics 119
3.2.9 Tie-In List 121
3.2.10 Demolition Drawings 121
3.2.11 Heat Tracing Circuit Layouts 124
3.2.12 Heat Tracing Logs 124
3.2.13 3-D Models 126
3.2.14 Model Indexes 126
3.2.15 CWP Drawing Packages and Scopes of Work
(SOW) 127
3.2.16 Process Flow Diagrams (PFDs) 131
3.2.17 Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams
(P&IDs) 131
3.2.18 Line Designation Tables (LDTs) 133

4 Detailed Design .................................................137
4.1 Introduction 137
4.2 Contracting and Procurement Plan and
Construction Execution Plan 138
4.3 Modularized and Field Erected Piping Splits and
CWP Boundaries 138
4.3.1 Notes to Figure 41 139
4.4 Model Boundaries 140
4.4.1 Study Model Boundaries 143
4.4.2 Detailed Model Boundaries 143
4.5 Shop and Field Material Splits 145
4.6 Procurement Splits 147
4.7 Issued For Bid and Bid Evaluations 150
4.7.1 Issued for Bid 150
4.7.2 Clarifications from Bidders and Bid
Evaluations 151
4.8 Equipment Coordinates and Elevations 151
4.9 Module Design 152
4.9.1 Design Considerations 154
4.10 Module Numbering 156
4.11 Drafting Practice 159
4.11.1 A Brief History 159
4.11.2 3-D CAD Drafting Practice 160
4.11.3 Ownership and Training 162
4.11.4 Piping Arrangements 165
4.11.5 Isometrics 165
4.12 Holds 166
4.13 Project Binders and Lists 167
4.13.1 Project Binders 167
4.13.2 Piping Job Notes and CAD Job Notes 168
4.13.3 Action Item List and Needs List 168
4.13.4 Equipment List 169
4.13.5 Data Sheets 169
4.14 Managing Standard Drawings 169
4.15 Project Meetings 170
4.16 Progress Monitoring 172
4.17 Design Change Notice (DCN) 175
4.18 Field Change Notice (FCN) 176
4.19 Request For Information (RFI) 176

5 Shop Fabrication ...............................................177
5.1 Introduction 177
5.2 Kick-off Meetings 178
5.3 Scopes of Work (SOW) 180
5.3.1 Example of Pipe Spool Fabrication Scope of
Work 180
5.3.2 Example of Module Fabrication and
Assembly Scope of Work 183
5.4 Instruction to the Fabricator 187
5.4.1 Example of Instruction to Fabricator 189
5.5 Requests For Information (RFI) 195
5.6 Visits with the Fabricators 195
5.6.1 The Value of Shop Visits 195
5.6.2 Supporting the Fabricators 197
5.7 Automatic Spool Generation 199
5.8 Conclusion 199

6 Field Construction.............................................201
6.1 Introduction 201
6.2 Support From the Home Office 201
6.2.1 Kick-off Meetings 201
6.2.2 Field Erection of Piping Scope of Work 202
6.2.3 Computers, 3-D Software Set-ups, and
Maintenance 205
6.2.4 Request For Information 205
6.3 Support in the Field 206
6.3.1 Utilizing the 3-D Models 206
6.3.2 Problem Solving 208
6.3.3 Punch Lists and Deficiency Reports 208
6.3.4 Compiling and Submitting RFIs 212
6.3.5 Investigating Back Charges and Extras 213
6.3.6 Progress Monitoring 214
6.3.7 Maintaining the Master Stick Files 214
6.3.8 As-Builting 214
6.4 Lessons Learned 215
6.5 Safety 215

Abbreviations ....................................................217

Index...................................................................223

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